An All-new Wearable Device Might Help in Detecting Cancer with Improved Precision

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A team of researchers from Michigan University is currently testing a new wearable device that can help in detecting cancer way earlier with improved precision. The team of researchers has developed a new wearable device –that they have named “the epitome of accuracy medicine” for detecting cancer cells circulating through the blood.

Dr. Daniel Hayes –Professor of Breast Cancer Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, states that no individual out there wishes to undergo a biopsy process. Biopsies are invasive and might get uncomfortable. However, in the current scenario, they are regarded as one of the most accurate methods of detecting cancers in human beings.

Wearable Device Making It Possible to Detect Cancer Through Blood

Dr. Hayes suggests that if there was a way to get cancer cells directly from blood, the samples could be then utilized for learning about advanced tumor biology as well as delivering direct care to the patients.

In an all-new study, Dr. Hayes along with his team of researchers at the University of Michigan has developed a revolutionary wearable device. The particular device is capable of filtering the circulating cancer cells in the blood. This technology can be helpful in replacing the conventional methods of liquid biopsy. In the given method, healthcare professionals can take urine or blood samples for looking into the associated markers of cancer.

How this Technology Works?

The cancer tumors are known to release cells into the bloodstream. This implies that by taking a proper blood sample and analyzing the same, the specialist might be capable of detecting cancer easily.

However, the researchers believe that it might easier than actually getting implemented. In patients having malign tumors, taking blood samples might not be enough. This is because, in such a case, cancer tumors release the cells into the blood. These cells then circulate across the bloodstream rapidly. As such, they might not show up using a single blood sample.

Facing such challenges, Dr. Hayes along with his team has come up with the idea of a wearable device that can carry out all the work that a typical liquid biopsy method is capable of doing –scanning the entire bloodstream for the presence of cancer cells.

The results of the study have been published in the “Nature Communications” journal.